Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Keppai Koozh-Ragi Porridge Recipe-Finger Millet Buttermilk Porridge

Ragi also know as finger millet is a rich source of calcium, protein, fiber, iron and other minerals. I usually drink oats porridge or multigrain porridge or ragi porridge after I come back from my morning walk. Ragi being a very good source of calcium is great for bone health. Being rich in iron, ragi consumption helps to improve the hemoglobin levels. I sincerely want to bring back these healthy and forgotten recipes into the modern kitchen.Today let us learn how to make Ragi koozh/keppai koozh following our easy recipe.

Ragi Porridge Recipe-Keppai Koozh
Ragi Porridge (with buttermilk)

Keppai Koozh-Ragi Porridge with buttermilk

Keppai Koozh-Ragi Porridge with buttermilk

 Prep Time : 5 mins
 Cook Time : 25 mins 
 Yields: 6 Balls as in the picture
 Recipe CategoryPorridge-Breakfast
 Recipe CuisineSouth Indian
 Author:

   Ingredients needed

   Ragi flour/Keppai Mavu - 1/2 cup
   Cooked rice - 1/4 cup
   Salt to taste
   Buttermilk as needed


Preparation

Mix ragi flour with enough water (I used 1 1/2 cup water) to form a thin batter. Leave it overnight or for 5-6 hours to ferment.

Method 

Heat 1 1/2 cup of water (quantity of water should be equal to the ragi mixture) in a pan with a little salt. When water starts boiling, reduce the heat to low and pour the ragi mix gradually stirring continuously with a ladle. This is done to prevent formation of lumps. Add cooked rice also to the mixture. (pic-2)

making of ragi koozh

Keep it on medium heat and cook stirring continuously for 15-20 minutes or until the ragi thickens. Wet your fingers and touch the ragi + rice mix, if it sticks, you have to cook for some more time. When the mixture does not stick, it indicates that it is cooked.

how to make ragi porridge

Allow it to cool a little. Dip your hands in cold water and make balls out of it.

finger millet porridge

For Ragi Porridge - Dissolve the ball in buttermilk, add salt required, needed water (according to the consistency required) mix well and enjoy it. You can have pearl onions or pickles or finely chopped raw mangoes or mor milagai as a side dish for this.

In case if you want to store the balls, keep it in a bowl of water inside the refrigerator (pic above). It will stay good for 3 days.

What I will do - After my morning walk, I will take out one ball, dissolve it in buttermilk, add needed salt, 2 finely chopped pearl onions and drink it. It is a very refreshing and healthy drink. It keeps me active the whole day.

Note - Adding cooked rice is optional.

Instead of adding cooked rice, you can also cook rice from scratch and then add the prepared ragi flour to it and follow the same steps mentioned above.

You might love my Ragi dosa recipe (keppai dosai) also.

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30 comments:

  1. refreshing cooler and energiser too.cute pot.

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  2. I love authentic recipes and this one is a keeper. Never had this in a long time !!

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  3. a good summer food to keep body hydrate and cool....well presented..

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  4. a very healthy and delicious porridge :)

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  5. super summer recipe,nothing can beat this...

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  6. Wat an authentic and nutritious porridge, love it very much.

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  7. Good one Padhu as always...thanks for your efforts...

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  8. Why do we soak ragi in water ... can we make the ragi ball recipe without soaking in water

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  9. Aditri- you do not have to put the balls, if you are not storing it. Read 'what I will do' in the last paragraph. I dissolve the ball in the water in which it was soaked, add butter milk and drink it in the morning. It is very refreshing.

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  10. thanks for the recipe.. I used to prepare ragi with oats mixed with buttermilk for my toddler.. he loves it..

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  11. whether fermentation s mandatory?...it s nt possible 2 do it instantly ah padhu? plz suggest me

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  12. Not necessary but the nutritional value increases with fermentation.

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  13. Is it possible to mix little bajra / kambu with this ?. If so please let me know in which form i can add bajra. ( flour form or boiled form).

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    Replies
    1. Yes, you can mix bajra flour with ragi flour. You should add it in powder (flour) form along with ragi flour and cook both together.

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  14. I am happy to find the details of ancient receipies which h I feel very much useful and inspiring to me. Thank you very much.
    Sujatha

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  15. is salt not required for fermentation?

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    Replies
    1. No, not necessary for this. Next day you must add salt and prepare the koozh .

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  16. Is there is any ragi porridge, without adding rice. For diabetic patients.

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    Replies
    1. You can do the same without adding rice.

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  17. Hey Padhu!
    Can i also make this with whole ragi soaked overnight? I don't get good quality ragi flour where i live.

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    Replies
    1. You can prepare the ragi flour at home. It is very easy. Clean and wash ragi well. Soak it overnight. Next day drain the water, rinse well and tie it in a cheese cloth or soft cotton cloth. Leave it another day. Then next day the ragi would have sprouted. Dry it in the sun or under the fan well. Then dry roast it on low heat until you get a nice aroma of roasted ragi flour. Then powder it in the flour mill. If using mixie, it will take a long time and it is very difficult.

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  18. I have learnt how to make healthy recipe in a very easy way... Thank you Padhu

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  19. Hello first if all let me thank you for your wonderful recipe blog. You are doing a great recipe bringing back all forgotten dishes.

    Now onto the fermenting process for this recipe. Does this ferment similar to dosa or idli batter? I soaked the ragi flour yesterday night and kept it inside heated oven. But I do not see the mix fermented. Does this froth.like.idli batter after fermentation?

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    Replies
    1. Thank you so much for liking my blog and recipes. It will not double or have the fermented smell as it happens for idli batter.

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